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In Between Cultures and Nation: Writing the Self in Singapore

  • Kwok-kan Tam
Chapter

Abstract

Since the 1980s, various theories have been proposed to depict the trends that would have an impact on the future of the world, as well as to conclude the twentieth century’s close as an end to ideological differences. In his book The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order (1998), Samuel Huntington predicted that the post-Cold War world would develop into an order in which “the most pervasive, important and dangerous conflicts will not be between social classes, rich and poor, or other economically defined groups, but between peoples belong to different cultural entities” (Hungtington 1998, 28). Huntington’s argument is based on the view that cultural differences have been the cause of many political and military clashes in history and the clashes based on ideological differences are now passé. In view of the sociopolitical changes that have occurred since the fall of the Berlin Wall, Huntington suggests that a new paradigm will be needed to reconfigure the new relations emerged as a result of increasing contacts between different civilizations in the age of globalization.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kwok-kan Tam
    • 1
  1. 1.The Hang Seng University of Hong KongShatinHong Kong

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