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Introduction: Englishization and the New Asian Subjectivity

  • Kwok-kan Tam
Chapter

Abstract

English has had the status of an international language since the nineteenth century, when the British Empire was established. It has been the most widely used language in the world, not only for business and technology but also for education, government, popular entertainment, aviation services, and international exchange. From a postcolonial perspective, the British Empire, though often condemned as economic exploitation and domination, is by far the most powerful attempt at Westernizing the world, bringing about far-reaching cultural changes in the past two centuries. To a large extent, the British Empire can still be felt in many parts of the world, particularly in Asia, through legacies of the colonial systems and the presence of English. A major legacy of the Empire is the Englishization of the world. The language of colonization, English is the major language of Westernization, or modernization, at least for Asia, if not for other parts of the English-speaking world.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kwok-kan Tam
    • 1
  1. 1.The Hang Seng University of Hong KongShatinHong Kong

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