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Towards ‘Learner Experience Research’

  • Shuang ZengEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

‘Interactive’, ‘participatory’ and ‘socially connected’ are qualities that feature heavily in recent discussions surrounding online tools and applications. With a particular focus on the use of Web 2.0 technologies, this book aims to explore Chinese undergraduates’ use and/or lack of use of the current web for their out-of-class English learning. Thus, this introductory chapter starts by defining the scope of this study and two important acronyms adopted in this book (i.e. ‘CALL’ and ‘WELL’). This chapter then illustrates how the present study is conceptualized, particularly why it is focused on learner voices and behaviours, and concerned with Chinese undergraduates. While the more conventional topic of research in the relevant academic field is often directed towards new technologies and their potential for language teaching and learning, this study explores learner experiences. After that, the English learning and technological conditions of Chinese universities are introduced, which lay the foundation for researching learner behaviours against a specific context of learning. Finally, this chapter briefly presents the research questions, theoretical foundation, methodology and the significance of the book before moving to the outline of the book structure.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.University of Shanghai for Science and TechnologyShanghaiChina

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