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Quantum Physics, Consciousness and Śūnya

  • S. Rammohan
Chapter

Abstract

Śūnya’ is the Indic symbol that bridges the Brahman of Vedānta and the material universe. Śūnya denotes void as well as infinite space. Aryabhata employs ‘Śūnya’ to denote number zero. ‘Śūnya’ or ‘nothing’ is something that cannot be defined. While Vedanta denotes Brahman as formless energy or consciousness, quantum scientist defines the universe as an inseparable web of vibrating energy patterns in which no single particle has reality independent of the entirety. The entirety includes the observer too.

Our consciousness has emerged from cosmic consciousness and becomes a part of the universal whole, however separated in space. This is epitomized in the very first verse of Kenopaniṣad. At the quantum level of reality, the demarcation between the realms of phenomena seems to blur. There is obviously only one alternative, viz. the unification of mind and consciousness. Quantum vacuum (QV), Brahman and Śūnya (void) are all indescribable entities. Quantum scientists tell us that the only universal language is that which can be at the level of gauge bosons. Can human mind be trained to transmit and receive at the level of QV? Probably the answer lies in the development of our consciousness through the practice of Yoga and meditation or the practice of inward journey, advised by Sri Ramana Maharshi.

Keywords

Consciousness Wave-particle duality Bell’s theorems Quantum field theory Supersymmetry Turīya 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Rammohan
    • 1
  1. 1.Sarasvati Research CentreChennaiIndia

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