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Spring Protection and Management: Some Case Histories from Across India’s Mountainous Regions

  • Jared Buono
  • Sunesh Sharma
  • Anil Kumar
  • Kaustubh Mahamuni
  • Bhupal Bisht
  • Sivakumar Adiraju
  • Lam Shabong
  • Amrtha Kasturirangan
Chapter

Abstract

Communities across mountain regions of India, from Nilgiris to Himalayan areas, get drinking water supply from approximately five million springs. These springs formed due to intersection of groundwater level with the land surface not only supply safe drinking water round the year but also feed rivers and maintain the ecosystems. However, environmental degradation, spirally increasing water demand and climate change phenomenon may pose sufficient stress to these vital resources. Effective steps are required to control dwindling spring discharge and deteriorating water quality, so that water scarcity, biodiversity and ecosystem can be protected. The combined efforts of NGOs, the state governments and communities to protect springsheds wherein studies of hydrogeological set up in identifying, protecting and augmenting groundwater recharge may be a better approach in the management of springs. However, such interventions are likely to vary in different valleys giving due considerations of the communities therein. It has been found that such interventions may result into fivefold increase of spring discharge and reduction of faecal coliform bacteria in drinking water through social fencing. Because of revival of traditional knowledge and decentralization of science, such approach is becoming successful. Collective and participatory actions by the communities and the local institutions are even taking up hydrogeological mapping which are being encouraged with public investment in several locations. This paper focuses on some of these encouraging results and experiences.

Keywords

Hydrogeology Springshed Water security 

References

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jared Buono
    • 1
  • Sunesh Sharma
    • 2
  • Anil Kumar
    • 2
  • Kaustubh Mahamuni
    • 3
  • Bhupal Bisht
    • 4
  • Sivakumar Adiraju
    • 5
  • Lam Shabong
    • 6
  • Amrtha Kasturirangan
    • 7
  1. 1.Cornell Cooperative Extension Ulster CountyKingstonUSA
  2. 2.People Science InstituteDehradunIndia
  3. 3.Advanced Centre for Water Development and ManagementPuneIndia
  4. 4.Central Himalayan Rural Action GroupNainitalIndia
  5. 5.VisakhaJilla Nava NirmanaSamithiNarasipatnamIndia
  6. 6.Meghalaya Basin Development AuthorityShillongIndia
  7. 7.ArghyamBangaloreIndia

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