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Cultural and Educational Exchanges Between Rival Societies: Challenges in Implementation and Strategies for Success

  • Phillip L. Henderson
  • Jonathan Spangler
Chapter
Part of the Education Innovation Series book series (EDIN)

Abstract

As the preceding chapters in this volume show, cultural and educational exchanges between rival states and societies are diverse in nature and can have significant positive and negative impacts on those involved and their societies more broadly. This concluding chapter first outlines some of the key challenges involved in implementing exchange programs, which are inherently case-specific and can have major impacts on the feasibility and outcomes of those programs. Taking these into consideration, the chapter then provides overviews of some strategies for success in implementing cultural and educational exchanges that are feasible and sustainable and have lasting positive impacts on those involved.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Phillip L. Henderson
    • 1
  • Jonathan Spangler
    • 2
  1. 1.National Chengchi UniversityTaipeiTaiwan
  2. 2.Asia-Pacific Policy Research AssociationTaipeiTaiwan

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