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Vitreous Hemorrhage

  • Xuemin Jin
  • Dong Qin
  • Yanting Wang
  • Shuangshuang Li
  • Jinfeng Han
  • Mengdi Li
Chapter
Part of the Ocular Trauma book series (OCTRA)

Abstract

The vitreous body is the clear gel-like substance that fills the space between the lens and the retina of humans. Its primary function is to keep the center of the eye clear. The presence of extravasated blood within the vitreous body is defined as vitreous hemorrhage. This condition may result from diseased retinal vessels or abnormal new vessels, rupture of normal retinal vessels, and/or spread of hemorrhage into vitreous from any other intraocular sources. Trauma is the leading cause of vitreous hemorrhage in young people and can be caused both by closed and open globe injury. It is always accompanied by many complications. If not handled properly, it may cause permanent blindness. Management of traumatic vitreous hemorrhage is complex and varies for each individual and each trauma. Eyes with small or moderate vitreous hemorrhage without obvious complications could be observed closely. In cases of vitreous hemorrhage associated with various anterior and posterior segment pathologies, early vitrectomy is recommended to provide early visual rehabilitation and management of any potentially treatable pathology. Timely and aggressive management of these injuries will offer the patient the best chances to salvage the eye and regain vision. But, in some severely injured eyes, all the efforts may be in vain, and ocular injury prevention is still the most important thing.

Keywords

Vitreous body Vitreous hemorrhage Closed globe injury Open globe injury Vitrectomy 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The writing of this chapter issupported by Henan Science and Technology Bureau grants (18210231045, 182102410004, 162102410004).

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Xuemin Jin
    • 1
  • Dong Qin
    • 1
  • Yanting Wang
    • 1
  • Shuangshuang Li
    • 1
  • Jinfeng Han
    • 1
  • Mengdi Li
    • 1
  1. 1.Henan Eye Hospital & Henan Eye InstituteHenan Provincial People’s HospitalZhengzhouChina

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