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Culture of Webworking: Knowing with an Endless Catalogue of Resources

  • Lena Redman
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter articulates the participatory character of digitised society facilitated by the ubiquity of postproduction tools. Liberalising the acquisition of cultural resources engenders a pervasive expansion of the universal phenomenon of remixing. In a digitised society, the remix spawns rapidly into a multi-hybridised category. It manifests itself through mashups, collages, montages, memes and vidding and becomes the prevalent medium of message-transmission. Its hybridisation is actualised not only within related modes of expressions but also within those that were considered incompatible before. Therefore, it is recognised as a form of deep remixability and is associated with the practices of do-it-yourself (DIY). Thus, people with even minimal knowledge of a given topic and having basic skills sufficient for their participation can engage in the social exchange of their opinions, representations and knowledge constructions. Following this trait, cinematic writing is merged with a DIY knowledge-production methodology based on a deep remixability hybrid that is termed cinematic bricolage.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Lena Redman
    • 1
  1. 1.Monash UniversityMelbourneAustralia

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