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Constructing the Modern Self in Translation (III): Lu Xun

  • Limin Chi
Chapter
Part of the New Frontiers in Translation Studies book series (NFTS)

Abstract

Lu Xun’s ideas about character building and the transformation of the “Chinese national character” constituted the guiding principles for his translation between the late 1910s and mid-1920s. This chapter explores how Lu Xun’s choice of foreign works for translation and his emulation of translated works facilitated his promotion of a modern identity (against the flaws he ascribed to the “Chinese national character”) through an examination of his integration of certain key concepts and literary models derived from foreign works in his own writings.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Limin Chi
    • 1
  1. 1.Kiangsu-Chekiang CollegeHong KongHong Kong SAR

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