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Introduction of Epidemiological Studies of “Nanbyo”

  • Masakazu Washio
  • Yutaka Inaba
Chapter
Part of the Current Topics in Environmental Health and Preventive Medicine book series (CTEHPM)

Abstract

“Nanbyo” in Japanese is commonly used in the Japanese society to refer to so-called “intractable diseases.” In this chapter, we would like to introduce “Nanbyo” and the role of the Research Committee of the Epidemiology of “Nanbyo.” In 1972, the Japanese government began systemic countermeasures against “Nanbyo.” Since then, the government has been promoting research on “Nanbyo.” The Research Committee of the Epidemiology of “Nanbyo” was first organized in 1976. Because “Nanbyo” are diseases of low incidence and patients are scattered all over Japan, epidemiologists and clinicians work together to prevent laborious work as well as to save cost, and epidemiologists have many precious experiences by working with clinicians. Furthermore, younger epidemiologists are able to learn how to conduct epidemiological studies from senior epidemiologists of other universities and research institutes all over Japan. Although the involvement of epidemiologists was much lower in Japan than in the United Kingdom and the United States, based on the success experience of “Nanbyo,” the government promotes collaborative studies with epidemiologists and clinicians to investigate not only “Nanbyo” but also other research subjects.

Keywords

Nanbyo (intractable diseases) Epidemiology 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Community Health and Clinical EpidemiologySt. Mary’s CollegeKurume CityJapan
  2. 2.Department of Epidemiology and Environmental HealthJuntendo University Faculty of MedicineBunkyo-kuJapan

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