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The Study of Optimal Illumination for Long Term Memory Activation: Preliminary Study

  • Chung Won Lee
  • Won Teak Kwak
  • Jin Ho Kim
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Electrical Engineering book series (LNEE, volume 513)

Abstract

This study is a preliminary study to verify the effect of long-term memory on light illumination. Experimental conditions of this study were 200, 400, 1000 lx. The color temperature was set to 5000 k in all three conditions. The participants consisted of four adults aged 24 years. The illumination was on the stand type engothh-8100 and the long-term memory was measured by the WFC task. The results showed that long-term memory was superior at 200 and 400 lx, which are relatively low illuminance than high illuminance of 1000 lx. In particular, long-term memory was found to be most active at 400 lx.

Keywords

Long-term memory LED lights WFC task Illumination 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Industrial and System EngineeringKongju National UniversitySeobuk-gu, Cheonon-siKorea

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