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The Shoot and Fruit Borer, Conogethes punctiferalis (Guenee): An Important Pest of Tropical and Subtropical Fruit Crops

  • Sandeep SinghEmail author
  • Gurlaz Kaur
  • S. Onkara Naik
  • P. V. Rami Reddy
Chapter

Abstract

Conogethes punctiferalis is a polyphagous species, well distributed in the tropics and subtropics. In Punjab and Himachal Pradesh, India, Conogethes has become a serious pest of plum, peach, pear, litchi and pomegranate. On guava, Conogethes is a major pest from the beginning of the twenty-first century infesting up to 20% fruits in Jammu and Kashmir, and Allahabad Safeda is the most susceptible cultivar to infestation. One of the ideal measures of protection would be to prevent moths from ovipositing on fruits for which the work on pheromones should be stepped up. While the components of pheromones have been identified, their proportion, wax supplement from the female hair pencils and trap designs need to be refined. Mass production and release of natural enemies on community basis and cultivation of tolerant/resistant cultivars will go a long way in protecting fruit crops from borer damage.

Keywords

Conogethes Host plants Integrated pest management Tropical fruits 

Notes

Acknowledgement

The authors are thankful to the Project Coordinator, ICAR-AICRP on Fruits; Project Coordinator, ICAR-Consortium Research Platform on Borers in Network Mode; and Director of Research, PAU, Ludhiana, for providing funds and research facilities, and photographs included in this chapter are of the senior author.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sandeep Singh
    • 1
    Email author
  • Gurlaz Kaur
    • 1
  • S. Onkara Naik
    • 2
  • P. V. Rami Reddy
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Fruit SciencePunjab Agricultural UniversityLudhianaIndia
  2. 2.Division of Entomology and NematologyICAR-Indian Institute of Horticultural ResearchBengaluruIndia

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