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Statistics on Education in India

  • Jandhyala B. G. Tilak
Chapter

Abstract

Educational statistics assume greater significance today than ever in view of the structural and systematic changes that are rapidly taking place in the social and economic sectors in India. The chapter reviews the current status of educational statistics, identify and discuss problems relating to educational statistics including their reliability, comparability of data collected by various institutions, gaps in data and the bottlenecks in their timely processing and dissemination, and outline important strategies for streamlining and improving the whole system.

Keywords

School statistics Budget expenditure Enrolments Teachers Examinations Manpower All-India Educational Survey All-India survey on higher education DISE NCERT SEMIS UGC 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This chapter is authored jointly with P.R. Panchmukhi and K.K. Biswal. This heavily draws from Tilak and Panchamukhi (2001).

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jandhyala B. G. Tilak
    • 1
  1. 1.New DelhiIndia

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