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The Effects of Adjustment on Education: A Review of Asian Experience

  • Jandhyala B. G. Tilak
Chapter

Abstract

With the introduction of new economic reform policies, commonly known as adjustment policies associated with the World Bank and IMF. These policies have been hailed by some as the most promising ones to make economies like that of India into a tiger and at the same time criticised by others as a signal of derailment from the Nehruvian path of planned development and welfare in India. With the help of some readily available data collected from UNESCO, World Bank and recent studies, a few comparisons are made in this chapter between eh ‘adjusting’ and the ‘non-adjusting’ countries in the development of education. The aim has been to examine whether there is any discernible difference in educational development trends between the two sets of countries. For this purpose, a select list of indicators of education development has been chosen, concentrating on the allocation of financial resources, growth in enrolment ratios and on quality and equity in primary education.

Keywords

Economic austerity Investment in education Expansion of education Quality of education Privatisation Public expenditure Primary education 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This is an expanded version of the author’s article published in Prospects Vol. XXVII, No. 1, March 1997. UNESCO’s permission to use the paper here is gratefully acknowledged. The original version was prepared as a Background Paper for the UNESCO Policy Discussion Paper on ‘The Impact of Austerity, Adjustment, and Restructuring on Education: Options for Policy Makers, Donors and International Cooperation.’ Paris: UNESCO

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Copyright information

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Authors and Affiliations

  • Jandhyala B. G. Tilak
    • 1
  1. 1.New DelhiIndia

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