Measurement of Residual Stress in As-Quenched 7055 Aluminum Plate by Various Methods

  • Hongwei Yan
  • Xiwu Li
  • Zhihui Li
  • Ya’nan Li
  • Shuhui Huang
  • Lizhen Yan
  • Yong’an Zhang
Conference paper

Abstract

The accuracy of different residual stress measurement methods has always been the research focus from the beginning of research on residual stress. In this study, both conventional and newly-developed methods were applied to measure the residual stress in as-quenched 7055 aluminum plate. Methods such as hole drilling, X-ray diffraction based on sin2Ψ and cos α approaches, crack compliance method and neutron diffraction method were used. In the meanwhile, finite element simulation was used to obtain the residual stress distribution as a comparison. The results showed that among the methods studied, X-ray diffraction method has the greatest test error due to its shallow test depth. However, if the measurement condition was well controlled, the error could be acceptable. The absolute values of residual stress obtained by X-ray diffraction method were slightly greater than hole drilling method. If calculated with the reasonably chosen crack compliance function, the test result was similar to neutron diffraction method. Under different quenching conditions, all the studied methods showed that the greater the quenching cooling rate, the greater the absolute value of residual stress.

Keywords

Aluminum alloy Residual stress Measurement 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by the National Key Research and Development Program of China (No. 2016YFB0300803). The authors are also grateful to senior engineer Xiaolong Liu for the neutron diffraction work.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hongwei Yan
    • 1
  • Xiwu Li
    • 1
  • Zhihui Li
    • 1
  • Ya’nan Li
    • 1
  • Shuhui Huang
    • 1
  • Lizhen Yan
    • 1
  • Yong’an Zhang
    • 1
  1. 1.State Key Laboratory of Non-ferrous Metals and ProcessesGeneral Research Institute for Nonferrous MetalsBeijingChina

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