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Addressing Stresses in Agriculture Through Bio-priming Intervention

  • Deepranjan Sarkar
  • Sumita Pal
  • Ms. Mehjabeen
  • Vivek Singh
  • Sonam Singh
  • Subhadip Pul
  • Jancy Garg
  • Amitava Rakshit
  • H. B. Singh
Chapter

Abstract

Concurrent occurrences of different stresses, i.e. biotic and abiotic, are very common in the environment of plants which consequently reduce yield. As cost-effective options are very limited, bio-priming is a suitable tool to address the numerous challenges associated with agriculture. Plant growth benefits are easily attainable through this technique while managing the natural resources and enhancing the environmental sustainability.

Keywords

Bio-priming Alleviation Abiotic stress Biotic stress 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Deepranjan Sarkar
    • 1
  • Sumita Pal
    • 1
  • Ms. Mehjabeen
    • 1
  • Vivek Singh
    • 2
  • Sonam Singh
    • 1
  • Subhadip Pul
    • 1
  • Jancy Garg
    • 1
  • Amitava Rakshit
    • 1
  • H. B. Singh
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Soil Science and Agricultural ChemistryInstitute of Agricultural Sciences, BHUVaranasiIndia
  2. 2.National Bureau of Agriculturally Important Microorganisms (NBAIM)Mau Nath BhanjanIndia
  3. 3.Department of Mycology and Plant PathologyInstitute of Agricultural Sciences, BHUVaranasiIndia

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