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The Migration-Development-Security Nexus: In Search of New Perspectives in the Changing East Asian Context

  • Riwanto Tirtosudarmo
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter is theoretical in nature, assessing the discourse on the nexus of migration, development and security, in East Asian contexts. It is aimed to critically scrutinise the development and genesis of a concept that increasingly became the dominant discourse in the academia and the policy circles, particularly in the northern rich industrialised countries. In the southern poor underdeveloped countries, strongly perceived as the source of evil, uncontrolled population growth, stagnant if not reverse economic development, communal and sectarian conflicts and wars; is a place that perceived both migrants and terrorism are originating and exported. Inequality between countries and regions should therefore be conceived as the crucial contexts in the search of viable perspective in the increasingly unequal world. While geographical exclusivity is getting irrelevant as information and communication technology connecting every places in the current globalised world, yet geographical proximity and regionalism apparently still matter. The chapter argued that traditional cross-border movement cannot be underestimated in East Asia, as well as in other parts of the world. The chapter proposed, in order to better understand the nexus of migration, development and security, an appreciation of a human being, and its freedom to move is critically important if a better world is really wanted to be realised for all human beings.

Keywords

Migration Development Security North-south East Asia Globalisation 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Riwanto Tirtosudarmo
    • 1
  1. 1.Research Center for Society and CultureIndonesian Institute of SciencesJakartaIndonesia

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