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A Critical Definition of Zexiao

  • Jing Liu
Chapter
Part of the Education in the Asia-Pacific Region: Issues, Concerns and Prospects book series (EDAP, volume 43)

Abstract

This chapter starts with a review of global public education reforms, emphasizing choice, efficiency, equity, excellence, and international competence, to summarize the meaning of school choice in a global context. By introducing theories and ideologies of educational selection, this chapter summarizes the shift of educational ideology with social change in China as background knowledge to further understand the development of Zexiao . Then, it reviews the development of Zexiao in China through social development and the changes in public school admission policies between the 1980s and the 2000s. It introduces the diversity and complexity of public junior high school admission and the channels of student placement in this process. The chapter concludes by summarizing the nature of Zexiao by examining the similarities and differences between Zexiao and school choice in general.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jing Liu
    • 1
  1. 1.The University of TokyoTokyoJapan

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