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Microbiota, Obesity and NAFLD

  • Louis H. S. Lau
  • Sunny H. WongEmail author
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 1061)

Abstract

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an increasingly important cause of chronic liver disease globally. Similar to metabolic syndrome and obesity, NAFLD is associated with alternations in the gut microbiota and its related biological pathways. While the exact pathophysiology of NAFLD remains largely unknown, changes in intestinal inflammation, gut permeability, energy harvest, anaerobic fermentation and insulin resistance have been described. In this chapter, we review the relationship between the gut microbiota, obesity and NAFLD, and highlight potential ways to modify the gut microbiota to help managing NAFLD patients.

Keywords

Fatty liver Microbiota Intestinal inflammation Gut permeability Energy harvest Insulin resistance 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Institute of Digestive Disease, State Key Laboratory of Digestive Diseases, Department of Medicine & Therapeutics and LKS Institute of Health SciencesThe Chinese University of Hong KongHong KongHong Kong

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