The Development of the Modern Business Corporation in 19th Century India: Building the Foundations for the Emergence of TISCO in the 20th Century

Chapter
Part of the Studies in Economic History book series (SEH)

Abstract

The development of the colonial India’s modern business corporation during the “Victorian” era was conditioned by governmental policy frameworks, institutional settings and private initiatives, thus preparing the preconditions for founding Second Industrial Revolution business enterprises like the Tata Iron and Steel Company (TISCO), founded in 1907. In this chapter, we will detail those conditions in three parts.

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© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Graduate School of Literature and Human SciencesOsaka City UniversityOsakaJapan

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