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Ravines: Prospective Zone for Carbon Sequestration

  • J. Somasundaram
  • A. K. Parandiyal
  • Pramod Jha
  • Brij Lal Lakaria
  • R. K. Singh
  • B. L. Mina
  • S. Kala
  • Shakir Ali
Chapter

Abstract

Ravines are the extreme form of land degradation owing to water erosion and along with gullies of various sizes occupy about 10.37 million ha area in the country which could be utilized for sequestering carbon through improving vegetation densities/plantations. In fact, ravines are the most fragile ecosystems that have very low soil carbon content due to their light texture and poor aggregate stability. Thus, there is an urgent need to manage and restore these lands with suitable cultural and management practices. In fact, utilization of medium and deep ravine lands for regular cultivation always remains challenging; however, these ravines can be alternatively utilized for energy plantation, augmentation of fuel and fodder demands for local populace and production of hardy underutilized fruits and oil seed-bearing tree/shrub species. Ravine lands, which are economically unsuitable for agriculture, can be successfully stabilized by planting fast-growing species like bamboo on the gully beds and buffel grass/dhaman grass (Cenchrus ciliaris) on the side slopes and the interspaces of gully bed for economic utilization of gullied land. It was also evident that Acacia nilotica, Bambusa species and Aegle marmelos are highly suitable for ravine area and provide a substantial role in carbon sequestration under ravine landforms of Chambal and Yamuna river. Similarly, Prosopis juliflora and Azadirachta indica have greater ability for sustaining site productivity due to their greater leaf litterfall and fine root production under Yamuna ravines. In this chapter, an attempt has been made to address some of the issue of ravines vis-à-vis potential zone for carbon sequestration.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. Somasundaram
    • 1
  • A. K. Parandiyal
    • 2
  • Pramod Jha
    • 1
  • Brij Lal Lakaria
    • 1
  • R. K. Singh
    • 3
  • B. L. Mina
    • 3
  • S. Kala
    • 3
  • Shakir Ali
    • 3
  1. 1.ICAR-Indian Institute of Soil ScienceBhopalIndia
  2. 2.ICAR-Indian Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Research CentreAgraIndia
  3. 3.ICAR-Indian Institute of Soil and Water Conservation, Research CentreKotaIndia

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