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Urban Climates in the Transformation of Australian Cities

  • Mary Myla Andamon
  • Andrew Carre
Chapter
Part of the Green Energy and Technology book series (GREEN)

Abstract

Climate change is set to significantly impact cities and those who live and work within them. This chapter reviews the changing climate in Australia and its consequent role in the transformation of Australian cities with emphasis on the impact to the built environment. Following this, a discussion explores the application of strategies to mitigate the adverse impacts of climate change on buildings and cities. While these strategies will be important for a transition to a low-carbon future, there is still a requirement for innovative research and developments that would pave clearer directions to achieve a lower carbon society.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Sustainable Building Innovation Laboratory, School of Property Construction and Project ManagementRMIT UniversityMelbourneAustralia

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