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From Preserving to Performing Culture in the Digital Era

  • Jennyfer Lawrence TaylorEmail author
  • Alessandro Soro
  • Paul Roe
  • Anita Lee Hong
  • Margot Brereton
Chapter

Abstract

We offer a vision of digitising culture as supporting cultural processes in the digital era, with a particular focus on participatory design approaches. In doing so, we draw on our own experiences of designing a cross-cultural digital community noticeboard with a very remote Australian Aboriginal community. We review several existing local and international perspectives on digitising culture that consider culture as artefacts, knowledge, language, and values, noting a common emphasis on creating cultural repositories and digital representations. We then advocate for a complementary viewpoint that shifts the focus from cultural repositories to cultural performances, informed by postcolonial computing theory. Finally, we highlight a series of open design, methodological, and ethical questions that will guide ongoing participatory design work to ensure that every community can create digital tools to embed in their cultural performance in the everyday, in and on their own terms.

Keywords

Digital community noticeboard Public displays Aboriginal Australia Community HCI4D ICT4D Postcolonial computing Participatory design Digital literacy 

Notes

Acknowledgements

We thank and acknowledge the Anindilyakwa community and their Land Council for the opportunity to develop this noticeboard with them, as well as the Australian Research Council for Linkage Grant LP120200329. We also acknowledge the support and generosity of those who have reviewed and given feedback on this chapter, in particular Heike Winschiers-Theophilus for her guidance.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jennyfer Lawrence Taylor
    • 1
    Email author
  • Alessandro Soro
    • 1
  • Paul Roe
    • 1
  • Anita Lee Hong
    • 1
  • Margot Brereton
    • 1
  1. 1.Queensland University of TechnologyBrisbaneAustralia

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