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Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury

  • Hyun-Yoon Ko
Chapter

Abstract

The initial neurological examination is important in assessing the severity and level of spinal cord injury. It helps establish a rational treatment plan and determine the prognosis and outcomes of neurological function. Over the past three decades, in cooperation with the International Spinal Cord Society (ISCoS), the American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) has improved the classification system by organizing consensus meetings of experts in various medical fields related to the treatment of patients with acute spinal cord injury. The results are the International Standards of Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury (ISNCSCI), the latest revised edition in 2011, updated 2015. The ISNCSCI consists of three components: sensory examination of light touch and pin prick sensation in each dermatome, manual muscle strength examination of 10 key muscles on each side of the body, and neurological rectal examination.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hyun-Yoon Ko
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Rehabilitation MedicineRehabilitation Hospital, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Pusan National University School of MedicineYangsanSouth Korea

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