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Systemic Chemotherapy in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

  • Dong Hoon Lee
  • Sung-Woo Park
Chapter

Abstract

Most chemotherapeutic agents available for prostate cancer have been used by single agents or various combinations. Historically, cyclophosphamide, 5-fluorouracil, estramustine, cisplatin, carboplatin, doxorubicin, mitoxantrone, paclitaxel, and docetaxel have been used [1]. With the exception of docetaxel (and the related agent, cabazitaxel) and mitoxantrone, the other agents for cytotoxic chemotherapy are not being used anymore because these agents have not been proved with either symptomatic improvements or survival benefit. Clinical trials using chemotherapy regimens used since 2000 have shown that the survival benefit of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients is between 16 and 20 months when used as a first-line chemotherapy [2, 3], but less than 6–12 months when using historical chemotherapy regimens before 2000s [1].

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of UrologyPusan National University Yangsan HospitalYangsanSouth Korea

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