Building on Achievements: Training Options for Gumbaynggirr Language Teachers

Chapter

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Faculty of EducationUniversity of SydneySydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Consultant Community TrainerResource Network for Linguistic DiversitySydneyAustralia
  3. 3.Muurrbay Language Teacher and ResearcherNew South WalesAustralia

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