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A Biomechanical Study of Young Women in High Heels with Fatigue and External Interference

  • Panchao Zhao
  • Zhongqiu JiEmail author
Conference paper
Part of the Communications in Computer and Information Science book series (CCIS, volume 728)

Abstract

From the perspective of biomechanics, gait inquiry under the influence of fatigue on young women wearing high heels and wear flat shoes with a difference. Explore the intervention of external interference conditions mechanism young women wearing high heels to keep the body in balance, and when you wear flat shoes with a difference.

Keywords

High-heeled shoes Fatigue External interference Gait Biomechanics 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This study is supported by the key technology of the old balance capability assessment and the development of training tools financial aid program (PXM2016-178215-000013). We would like to thank the patients for their participation in the study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Beijing Normal UniversityBeijingChina

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