Design and Calculation of Power Aperture Parameters with Variable SNR

  • Prabhansh Varshney
  • Shagun Bishnoi
  • Sudhir Kumar Chaturvedi
  • Dipen Patel
  • D. Tejaswini
Conference paper
Part of the Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing book series (AISC, volume 624)

Abstract

The paper represents a process for designing search radar and power aperture calculation for variable signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) methods. Surveillance or search radars regularly search defined volume in space scanning for preys. These are usually used to excerpt prey data such as range, angular position, and probably prey velocity. Various search patterns are to be accepted, relying on the radar design and antenna. To accomplish this goal, we use the extension of radar range equation which is used to analyze and design the surveillance radar which is most frequent in large radar system, and the performance measurement is usually used to classify the radar kinds is power aperture product that is the product of the radar average power and the effective radar antenna area. Tracking radars use pencil beam patterns of antenna. It is because of this that a different search radar is desired to facilitate prey acquisition by the tracker. For making this, we are taking the assumption that we must have to search the angular region, and taking all azimuths and elevation area of the sector is small. The area may be in various shapes, in any coordinate system. The most opted surveillance regions are the area of the surface of a sphere surrounded by few elevation and azimuth stretch.

Keywords

Search radar Radar design and antenna Prey acquisition Azimuths and elevation area 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Prabhansh Varshney
    • 1
  • Shagun Bishnoi
    • 1
  • Sudhir Kumar Chaturvedi
    • 1
  • Dipen Patel
    • 1
  • D. Tejaswini
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Aerospace EngineeringUniversity of Petroleum and Energy StudiesDehradunIndia

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