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New Chinese Immigrants in Spain: The Migration Process, Demographic Characteristics and Adaptation Strategies

  • Minghuan Li
Chapter

Abstract

Most Chinese in today’s Spain are first-generation immigrants; almost all emigrated from China after the late 1970s, when China reopened its door to the West. In about three decades between the mid-1980s and the mid-2010s, the number of Chinese migrants in Spain has grown more than 100-fold. This chapter traces the migration process of Chinese to Spain, describes their sociodemographic characteristics, and analyzes their economic activities and the social challenges they face. In particular, it addresses the following questions: Why did hundreds of thousands of Chinese choose Spain, not a traditional country of Chinese immigration? How did they migrate? And what are their adaptation strategies to cope with life there?

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Minghuan Li
    • 1
  1. 1.Jinan UniversityGuangzhouChina

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