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Health Disaster Planning

  • Andrew RobertsonEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

As a medical administrator, being able to deal with an evolving disaster, whether that is as part of the response to an external disaster or managing an internal failure impacting a hospital’s operation, is a core competency that needs to be developed. In this chapter, health disaster planning is reviewed from an Australian perspective, with special emphasis placed on the principles involved; their application, particularly in preparing, responding and recovering from a disaster; ethical, legal, personnel and organisational considerations, and some critical areas for review, such as burn care and imaging, which have the potential to derail the best prepared plans. By design, this chapter can only introduce the medical administrator to the broad scope of disaster medicine and further resources are included in the bibliography at the end of the chapter.

Keywords

Business continuity management Coordination Communication Disaster Disaster preparedness Disaster Medicine Disaster Management Emergency Management Surge Management Triage 

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Further Reading

  1. Briggs SM, Brinsfield KH. Advanced disaster medical response: manual for providers. Boston: Harvard Medical International; 2003.Google Scholar
  2. Ciottone GR. Disaster medicine. Philadelphia: Mosby Elsevier; 2006.Google Scholar
  3. Geiling J. Fundamental disaster management. Mount Prospect, IL: Society of Critical Care Medicine; 2009.Google Scholar
  4. Hogan DE, Burstein JL. Disaster medicine. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams and Wilkins; 2002.Google Scholar
  5. Koenig KL, Schultz CH. Koenig and Schultz’s disaster medicine: comprehensive principles and practices. New York: Cambridge University Press; 2010.Google Scholar
  6. Powers R, Daily E. International disaster nursing. Port Melbourne: Cambridge University Press; 2010.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Public and Aboriginal Health DivisionWestern Australian Department of HealthEast PerthAustralia

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