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Politics, Policies and Media

  • Bennie Ng
Chapter

Abstract

Australia has a well-balanced public-private healthcare system and the governments play significant roles in designing, resourcing and executing health policies that underpin this across the country. In addition, Australians consistently rate health and hospitals as one of the top issues which influences their votes. At the crossroad of information, ideas and interests are our democratic political system and the communication through multiple media channels.

Medical leadership is inextricably linked to politics, policies and media. The complexity of the environment demands a strong understanding how these elements operate and interact at different levels. Healthcare and medical leaders are expected to have the ability to competently navigate the system so to improve patient care and influence health policies at the same time.

Being able to identify issues and articulate solutions to key decision makers in the appropriate context is a vital competency. Effective medical leaders should lever the specialised knowledge of structure and process design of governments and public service to optimise health policy outcomes. This will in turn enable organisations to communicate strategically in order to positively contribute and influence policy debate with stakeholders and the public.

Keywords

Australian Health Ministers’ Advisory Council (AHMAC) Council of Australian Governments (COAG) Health Department and Health Minister Media management in healthcare Healthcare funding and health policies 

References

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Further Reading

  1. Australia’s Health 2018, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Australian Government, 2018.Google Scholar
  2. Australia’s Welfare 2017, Australian Institute of Health and Welfare, Australian Government, 2017Google Scholar
  3. Australia’s Prime Ministers: from Barton to Howard, Brian Carroll, Rosenberg Publishing Pty Ltd., 2004.Google Scholar
  4. Factsheets, Australia’s Prime Ministers Centre, Museum of Australian Democracy, 2018.Google Scholar
  5. Tiernan A, Weller P. Learning to be a minister: Heroic expectations, practical realities. Melbourne: Melbourne University Press; 2010.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bennie Ng
    • 1
  1. 1.Partnerships and Strategy, HealthscopeMelbourneAustralia

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