Flipping a Collaborative Classroom to Gain Deeper Understanding of the Health System

  • Allyson Mutch
  • Charlotte Young
  • Neville Smith
  • Kate van Dooren
  • Cassandra Ranatunga
  • Cathie Gillan
  • Katie Brooker
  • Greg Fowler
  • Lisa Fitzgerald
Chapter

Abstract

The Health Systems and Policy course provides a broad introduction and overview of the Australian health system but has had to overcome the challenge that many students anticipate a dry and boring course of limited relevance or interest. We decided to take a different and more integrated approach that would foster deeper learning through the introduction of collaborative processes that placed students at the centre of class discussions. Learning objectives, teaching activities and assessment were realigned, and activities were developed to establish foundational knowledge outside the classroom that would inform and support discussion, reflection, engagement and debate within the classroom. The following chapter maps our teaching team’s journey through the redevelopment of The Health Systems and Policy course. The chapter is divided into four sections. The first describes what we did, the second outlines how we did it, and the third reflects on our experiences. Some members of the teaching team maintained regular diaries of the semester; these reflections inform section three. In the final section, we briefly discuss some ‘next steps’.

Keywords

Teaching Collaborative learning Active learning Flipped classroom Student engagement Team work Public health Higher education Undergraduate 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Allyson Mutch
    • 1
  • Charlotte Young
    • 1
  • Neville Smith
    • 1
  • Kate van Dooren
    • 1
  • Cassandra Ranatunga
    • 1
  • Cathie Gillan
    • 1
  • Katie Brooker
    • 1
  • Greg Fowler
    • 1
  • Lisa Fitzgerald
    • 1
  1. 1.University of QueenslandBrisbaneAustralia

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