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Social and Emotional Learning: Lessons Learned and Opportunities Going Forward

  • Andrew J. Martin
  • Rebecca J. Collie
  • Erica Frydenberg
Chapter

Abstract

In recent years, there has been a substantial body of theory, research, and practice in the areas of social and emotional learning (SEL) and social and emotional competence (SEC). The bulk of this has centered on research emerging from the USA, the UK, and Europe. However, there is now a growing corpus of work emanating from Australia and the Asia-Pacific. Based on key findings and lessons learned from research and practice conducted in the region (and beyond), the present chapter offers some cautionary notes for future implementation and research into SEL. The chapter also identifies the many exciting opportunities and contributions that SEL theory, research, and practice offer for human development going forward.

Keywords

Social and emotional learning Social and emotional competence Human development Australia Asia-Pacific 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andrew J. Martin
    • 1
  • Rebecca J. Collie
    • 1
  • Erica Frydenberg
    • 2
  1. 1.School of EducationUniversity of New South WalesSydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Melbourne Graduate School of EducationUniversity of MelbourneMelbourneAustralia

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