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Pharmacology

  • Jennifer H. Martin
Chapter

Abstract

  1. 1.

    Most therapeutics have no evidence on safety, efficacy and dose in the older age groups.

     
  2. 2.

    Changes in physiology with age and the added burdens of comorbidity and concomitant medications affect the way drugs are handled in the body.

     
  3. 3.

    These changes also affect how drugs work in the body.

     
  4. 4.

    Non-pharmacological interventions should be considered first, if possible.

     
  5. 5.

    Starting with the lowest dose possible and increasing only if efficacy has not been achieved and higher doses are tolerated.

     
  6. 6.

    A consideration of deprescribing (including dose reductions) should be undertaken at every visit of every doctor managing health problems in the older age groups.

     

Notes

Glossary

ADE

Adverse drug event

ADR

Adverse drug reaction

BD

Twice daily

Cl

Clearance

e.g.

For example

GP

General practitioners

i.e.

That is

PD

Pharmacodynamic

PK

Pharmacokinetic

PPI

Proton pump inhibitor

PRN

As needed

t1/2

Half-life

TDS

Three times daily

Vd

Volume of distribution

References

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Copyright information

© The Editor(s)  2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Medicine and Public HealthUniversity of NewcastleNewcastleAustralia
  2. 2.Internal MedicineHunter New England HealthNewcastleAustralia

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