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Aluminium Alloys for Aerospace Applications

  • P. Rambabu
  • N. Eswara Prasad
  • V. V. Kutumbarao
  • R. J. H. Wanhill
Chapter
Part of the Indian Institute of Metals Series book series (IIMS)

Abstract

This chapter starts with a brief overview of the historical development of aerospace aluminium alloys. This is followed by a listing of a range of current alloys with a description of the alloy classification system and the wide range of tempers in which Al alloys are used. A description is given of the alloying and precipitation hardening behaviour, which is the principal strengthening mechanism for Al alloys. A survey of the mechanical properties, fatigue behaviour and corrosion resistance of Al alloys is followed by a listing of some of the typical aerospace applications of Al alloys. The Indian scenario with respect to production of primary aluminium and some aerospace alloys, and the Type Certification process of Al alloys for aerospace applications are described. Finally there is a critical review of some of the gaps in existing aerospace Al alloy technologies.

Keywords

Aluminium Alloys Castings Wrought products Mechanical properties Fatigue Fracture Corrosion Applications 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors wish to thank several colleagues from DRDO whose inputs have become part of this chapter. They particularly would like to thank Dr. Amol A. Gokhale, Dr. Ashim K. Mukhopadyay, Mr. V.P. Deep Kumar, Dr. Shirish Kale and Mr. Sanjay Chawla. Two of the authors (PRB and NEP) are thankful to CEMILAC and DRDO for support and funding.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Rambabu
    • 1
  • N. Eswara Prasad
    • 2
  • V. V. Kutumbarao
    • 3
  • R. J. H. Wanhill
    • 4
  1. 1.RCMA (Materials), CEMILACHyderabadIndia
  2. 2.DMSRDE, DRDOKanpurIndia
  3. 3.DMRLHyderabadIndia
  4. 4.EmmeloordThe Netherlands

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