Proof and Argumentation in Mathematics Education Research

  • Andreas J. Stylianides
  • Kristen N. Bieda
  • Francesca Morselli

Abstract

In the chapter on proof in the previous PME Research Handbook, Mariotti (2006) observed that there had seemed to be “a general consensus on the fact that the development of a sense of proof constitutes an important objective of mathematics education” and also “a general trend towards including the theme of proof in the curriculum” (p. 173).

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© Sense Publishers 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Andreas J. Stylianides
    • 1
  • Kristen N. Bieda
    • 2
  • Francesca Morselli
    • 3
  1. 1.Faculty of EducationUniversity of CambridgeCambridgeUK
  2. 2.Department of Teacher EducationMichigan State UniversityEast Lansing, MIUSA
  3. 3.Department of MathematicsUniversità di GenovaGenoaItaly

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