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Abstract

Contemporary African societies bear the imprint of the legacy of colonialism but they are also marked both by their pre-colonial heritage and their different postcolonial experiences. The way Africa is known today is a reflection of the political, economic and historical intrusions and constructions of its societies that resulted from colonial contact with Europeans in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Keywords

Intellectual Property Indigenous People Indigenous Community Traditional Knowledge Indigenous Knowledge 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Sense Publishers 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward Shizha

There are no affiliations available

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