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Abstract

In this chapter we reflect on the basic assumptions, diagnostic procedures and preventive and curative medicinal techniques of African Traditional Medicine (ATM). In the course of discussion we assess some of the frequently prescribed herbs, with a focus on recent phytochemical reports.

Keywords

Indigenous Knowledge Immune Booster Moringa Oleifera Traditional Practitioner Indigenous Knowledge System 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Sense Publishers 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gloria Emeagwali

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