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Challenges of Mathematics Education in a Multilingual Post-Colonial Context

The Case of Suriname
  • Emmanuelle Le Pichon
  • Ellen-Rose Kambel

Abstract

In spite of Suriname’s national independence, the Dutch language has remained the primary medium of instruction used in the school system, and the only medium that may open the access to upward social mobility in Suriname. However, Dutch is one of the home languages for only a small minority of the pupils. A high percentage of children, especially in the interior of the country, may have never heard a word of Dutch until they start school (Arends & Carlin, 2002, p. 285).

Keywords

Mathematic Education Indigenous People Word Problem Language Policy Mother Tongue 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2016

Authors and Affiliations

  • Emmanuelle Le Pichon
    • 1
  • Ellen-Rose Kambel
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Modern LanguagesUtrecht UniversityThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Rutu FoundationIntercultural Multilingual EducationUtrechtThe Netherlands

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