Internationalising the Curriculum in Business

An Overview
  • Wendy Green
  • Craig Whitsed
Part of the Global Perspectives on Higher Education book series (GPHE, volume 28)

Abstract

Disciplines are at the heart of the IoC process. Each discipline has its own culture and history, its own ways of investigating, understanding, and responding to the world (Becher, 1989). Differences between disciplines extend far beyond the content taught; they ‘go to the heart of teaching, research and student-faculty relationships’ (Becher & Trowler, 2001, p. 4).

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wendy Green
    • 1
  • Craig Whitsed
    • 2
  1. 1.Tasmanian Institute of Learning & TeachingUniversity of TasmaniaAustralia
  2. 2.Centre for University Teaching & LearningMurdoch UniversityPerthAustralia

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