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Introduction: The Functions and Interactions of Non-State Actors in the Realm of International Humanitarian Law

  • Ezequiel HeffesEmail author
  • Marcos D. Kotlik
  • Manuel J. Ventura
Chapter

Abstract

The term ‘international law’ was coined in 1789 by Jeremy Bentham, eventually becoming the predominant expression used by specialized literature, in lieu of ‘the law of nations’ or ‘droit des gens’, which were translations of the Latin term employed by Hugo Grotius: ‘ius gentium’.

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Copyright information

© T.M.C. Asser Press and the authors 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ezequiel Heffes
    • 1
    Email author
  • Marcos D. Kotlik
    • 2
  • Manuel J. Ventura
    • 3
    • 4
  1. 1.Geneva CallGenevaSwitzerland
  2. 2.School of LawUniversity of Buenos AiresBuenos AiresArgentina
  3. 3.Office of the Prosecutor, International Residual Mechanism for Criminal TribunalsArushaTanzania
  4. 4.School of LawWestern Sydney UniversitySydneyAustralia

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