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Perspectives on the Intervention of the ICC in Palestine

  • Seada Hussein AdemEmail author
Chapter
Part of the International Criminal Justice Series book series (ICJS, volume 21)

Abstract

Peace and justice are no longer viewed as mutually exclusive. Establishing sustainable peace requires addressing injustices and combatting the culture of impunity. The proper application and sequencing of transitional justice tools enable peace and justice to augment each other. This chapter discusses this inherent connection between peace and justice in light of the intervention of the International Criminal Court in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. It is difficult to categorically measure and conclusively assert the impact the International Criminal Court’s investigations and prosecutions could have on the conflict before the Court finalizes the intervention. In comparison with other situations the Court has dealt with, this chapter addresses potential impacts of the Court’s intervention on combating impunity, the statehood question of Palestine, the stability of the two nations and the credibility of the Court itself. Taking note of the often raised claim that prosecution of alleged crimes committed in the conflict would disrupt peace settlements, the chapter also examines the pros and cons of establishing accountability on peace efforts.

Keywords

Peace negotiation Transitional justice Combating impunity Prosecution Situation in Palestine International Criminal Court 

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Copyright information

© T.M.C. Asser Press and the author 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.AlexandriaUSA

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