Ruptures pp 139-156 | Cite as

Fluidity and Possibility

Imagining Woman of Colour Pedagogies
  • Kirsten Edwards

Abstract

It does not require much effort to recall my first week of university as an undergraduate. Everything was so new and different, and quite frankly, a bit overwhelming. The recollection of that first week has stayed with me to this day. But I assume mine is not a unique experience.

Keywords

Black Woman Indigenous Knowledge Curriculum Study Critical Race Theory Harvard Educational Review 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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© Sense Publishers 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kirsten Edwards

There are no affiliations available

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