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“Back to the Future” Building Mentoring Capacity in Physical Education Teacher Education Students

An “Assessment for Learning” Approach
  • Amanda Mooney
  • Loris Gullock
Chapter
  • 903 Downloads

Abstract

In 1985 the motion picture Back to the Future heralded the idea that travelling back in time (to 1955) could inadvertently alter the course of events that lead to one’s future. The above scene in particular shifts the focus from the tangible “here and now” form of Einstein (“Doc” Brown’s dog) to imagining possibilities for his existence in a different era. Although abstract, given our inability to travel back in time from the future, in applying this thinking to Physical Education Teacher Education (PETE) we can begin to conceive of the types of knowledge and skills “future” teachers may require, not only within their subject discipline, but also for future roles within the school community, such as being a pre-service teacher mentor.

Keywords

Physical Education Student Teacher Prospective Teacher Assessment Task Physical Education Teacher Education 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2013

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amanda Mooney
    • 1
  • Loris Gullock
    • 2
  1. 1.School of Health SciencesUniversity of BallaratVictoriaAustralia
  2. 2.School of Health SciencesUniversity of BallaratVictoriaAustralia

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