The use of knowledge sources amongst novice accountants, engineers, nurses and teachers

An exploratory study
  • Leif Chr. Lahn

Abstract

The concept of epistemification (Stutt & Motta, 1998; Hakkarainen, Pelonen, Paavola, & Lehtinen, 2004) has recently made its way into the literature on technology and society.

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leif Chr. Lahn
    • 1
  1. 1.University of OsloNorway

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