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Composting the Imagination in Popular Education

  • Astrid von Kotze
Part of the International Issues in adult Education book series (ADUL, volume 10)

Abstract

True genesis is not at the beginning but at the end, and it starts to begin only when society and existence become radical, i.e. grasp their roots. But the root of history is the working, creating human being who reshapes and overhauls the given facts. Once he (sic) has grasped himself and established what is his, without expropriation and alienation, in real democracy, there arises in the world something which shines into the childhood of all and in which no one has yet been: homeland.’

Keywords

Emotional Intelligence Lifelong Learning Adult Education Participatory Rural Appraisal Political Imagination 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Astrid von Kotze

There are no affiliations available

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