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Professional Knowledge of Practising Teachers of Mathematics

  • Janette Bobis
  • Joanna Higgins
  • Michael Cavanagh
  • Anne Roche

Abstract

Teachers’ knowledge of mathematics has become a central focus of educational researchers and policy makers with conceptions of teacher knowledge continuously being transformed. Intuitively, we have known for some time what research now provides an evidence base for—that “teacher knowledge matters” (Sullivan, 2008b, p. 2). But exactly what knowledge matters more, and why, are more significant and vexing questions for researchers and educators to address. Consequently, attention has moved beyond looking solely at what knowledge teachers possess to why different types of knowledge are important and how that knowledge is acquired, studied and impacts on the quality of instruction.

Keywords

Content Knowledge Pedagogical Content Knowledge Mathematical Knowledge Professional Learning Professional Knowledge 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Janette Bobis
    • 1
  • Joanna Higgins
    • 2
  • Michael Cavanagh
    • 3
  • Anne Roche
    • 4
  1. 1.Faculty of Education and Social WorkUniversity of SydneySydneyAustralia
  2. 2.Faculty of Education and Social WorkUniversity of SydneySydneyAustralia
  3. 3.School of EducationMacquarie UniversityBurnie TAS 7320Australia
  4. 4.Mathematics Teaching and Learning Research Centre AustralianCatholic UniversityWashingtonUnited States

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