Advertisement

Deliberative Democracy, People’s Agency and Education

A Case of Dialogic Transformation of a School System
  • Gaysu R. Arvind
Chapter
  • 995 Downloads
Part of the Critical Issues in The Future of Learning and Teaching book series (CIFL)

Abstract

This chapter briefly looks into the ways of invigorating democracy by constructing deliberative decision-making spaces in access to school and its curricular and governance practices. The theoretical framework is largely informed by works of Amartya Sen on democracy and social justice, Archon Fung on empowered participatory governance (EPG), the Brazilian experience of the Citizen School Project, and the structural provisions made in the Indian Constitution for local governance. Drawing on case studies of bottom-up approaches to strengthen school functioning, the chapter examines an array of innovative forms of people-based participatory governance practices that emerged in diverse settings to make the state more responsive and accountable for the education of marginalized children in the traditionally unequal Indian society. These practices also enabled a fuller realization of peoples’ rights, as even citizens drawn from the lowest strata of the society experienced empowerment by influencing larger state institutions and policies that affect schooling and life options of their children. These peoplecentric efforts gain further significance as they emerged against the backdrop of enduring inequalities and asymmetries embedded in the mainstream social and educational system. The article ends on a cautionary note, warning that in the absence of an enabling context, in existing neo-liberal times the emerging practices of school transformation and social justice run a risk of either withering away, or degenerating into piecemeal measures for crisis intervention, leaving neither a legacy of empowerment nor a hint of systemic change.

Keywords

Deliberative Democracy Governance Practice Local Governance Government School Social Choice Theory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

REFERENCES

  1. Aga Khan Foundation - India. The PESLE assessment study. New Delhi: Author; 2007.Google Scholar
  2. Alam MS, Raju S. Contextualizing inter, intra-religious and gendered literacy. Educational and Political Weekly. 2007;42(18):1613–1622.Google Scholar
  3. Apple MW, Au W. Politics, theory, and reality in critical pedagogy. In: Cowen R, Kazamias AM, editors. International handbook of comparative education. London: Springer; 2009. p. 991–1007.Google Scholar
  4. Bhattacharya D. Civic community and its margins. Economic and Political Weekly. 2001;36(8):673–683.Google Scholar
  5. Brown P. The 'third wave': Education and the ideology of parentocracy. In: Halsey AH, Lauder H, Brown P, Wells AS, editors. Education, culture, economy and society. Oxford: Oxford University Press; 1997. p. 393–408.Google Scholar
  6. Byrne D. Social exclusion. Buckingham, UK: Open University Press; 1999.Google Scholar
  7. Fine M. Apparent involvement: Reflections on parents, powers and urban public schools. In: Halsey AH, Lauder H, Brown P, Wells AS, editors. Education, culture, economy and society. Oxford: Oxford University Press; 1997. p. 460–475.Google Scholar
  8. Flecha R. The dialogic sociology of the learning communities. In: Apple MW, Ball SJ, Gandin LA, editors. The Routledge international handbook of the sociology of education. New York: Routledge Taylor and Francis; 2010. p. 340–348.Google Scholar
  9. Fuchs M, Linkenbach A. Social movements. In: Das V, editor. The Oxford India companion to sociology and social anthropology, vol. II. New Delhi: Oxford University Press; 2003.Google Scholar
  10. Fukuda-Parr S. The human development paradigm: Operationalizing Sen's ideas on capabilities. In: Agarwal B, Humphries J, Robeyns I, editors. Capabilities, freedom and equality: Amartya Sen's work from a gender perspective. New Delhi: Oxford University Press; 2006. p. 328–346.Google Scholar
  11. Fung A, Wright EO. Deepening democracy: Institutional innovations in empowered participatory governance. London: Verso; 2003.Google Scholar
  12. Fung A. Associations and democracy: Between theories, hopes, and realities. Annual Review of Sociology. 2003;29:515–539.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Fung A. Empowered participation: Reinventing urban democracy. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press; 2004.Google Scholar
  14. Gandin LA. The democratization of governance in the citizenship school project: Building a new notion of accountability in education. In: Apple MW, Ball SJ, Gandin LA, editors. The Routledge international handbook of the sociology of education. New York: Routledge Taylor and Francis; 2010. p. 349–357.Google Scholar
  15. Gaventa, J. (2006). Triumph, deficit or contestation? Deepening the 'deepening democracy' debate. (IDS Working paper 264). Brighton, UK: IDS.Google Scholar
  16. Government of India. Select educational statistics 2003—2004. New Delhi: Department of Education, MHRD; 2006.Google Scholar
  17. Govinda, R. (2008). Education for all by 2015: Will we make it? (India: Country case study. Country profile commissioned for the EFA global monitoring report, 2008). Paris: UNESCO.Google Scholar
  18. Govinda R, Diwan R. Community participation and empowerment in primary education. New Delhi: Sage Publications; 2003.Google Scholar
  19. Jayal NG, Prakash A, Sharma PK, editors. Local governance in India: Decentralization and beyond. New Delhi: Oxford University Press; 2006.Google Scholar
  20. Jeffery P. Introduction: Hearts, minds and pockets. In: Chopra R, Jeffery P, editors. Educational regimes in contemporary India. New Delhi: Sage Publications; 2005. p. 13–38.Google Scholar
  21. Kabeer, N. (2006). Social exclusion and the MDGs: The challenge of 'durable inequalities' in the Asian context. Retrieved June 24, 2011, from: http://www.eldis.org/vfile/upload/1/document/0708/DOC21178.pdf.
  22. Kumar, K. (2008, January 19-25). Partners in education? Economic & Political Weekly, 43(3), 8-11.Google Scholar
  23. Pinto MR. People-centred development and participatory urban governance: The Mumbai experience. In: Jayal NG, Prakash A, Sharma PK, editors. Local governance in India: Decentralization and beyond. New Delhi: Oxford University Press; 2006. p. 202–220.Google Scholar
  24. Pratham Resource Centre. Annual status of education report (ASER: Rural). Mumbai: Author; 2007.Google Scholar
  25. Putnam RD. Bowling alone: The collapse and revival of American community. New York: Simon and Schuster; 2000.Google Scholar
  26. Ramachandran V, Saihjee A. The new segregation in primary education: Implications for local governance. In: Jayal NG, Prakash A, Sharma PK, editors. Local governance in India: Decentralization and beyond. New Delhi: Oxford University Press; 2006. p. 162–188.Google Scholar
  27. Sen, A. (1999). Democracy and social justice. Paper presented at the Seoul Conference on Democracy, Market Economy and Development in February, 1999. Retrieved June 24, 2011, from http://www.devoutreach.com/summer99/SpecialReport/tabid/839/Default.aspx.
  28. Sen, A. (2000). Social exclusion: Concept, application, and scrutiny. Social development paper No. 1, Asian Development Bank.Google Scholar
  29. Sen A. The argumentative Indian. London: Penguin; 2005.Google Scholar
  30. Sen, A. (2006). The possibility of social choice. In B. Agarwal, J. Humphries, & I. Robeyns (Eds.), Capabilities, freedom and equality: Amartya Sen's work from a gender perspective (pp. xxx-xxx). New Delhi: Oxford University Press.[NOTE: couldn't find page numbers]Google Scholar
  31. Walker A, Walker C. Britain divided: The growth of social exclusion in the 1980s and 1990s. London: Child Poverty Action Group; 1997.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gaysu R. Arvind
    • 1
  1. 1.Central Institute of EducationUniversity of DelhiIndia

Personalised recommendations