Advertisement

Exploring the Nature of Teachers’ Professional Learning

  • John Loughran
  • Amanda Berry
  • Allie Clemans
  • Stephen Keast
  • Bianca Miranda
  • Graham Parr
  • Philip Riley
  • Elizabeth Tudball

Abstract

In recent times, the distinction between traditional Professional Development (PD) and Professional Learning (PL) is becoming increasingly apparent. The shift associated with the intent and the language between PD and PL is evident in the report by Wei et al. (2009). The distinction between PD and PL is also captured by Mockler (2005) who characterized PD as something delivered in a ‘spray-on’ manner in which teachers attend a ‘PD day’ then return to their schools with the expectation that they will implement the workshop ideas in their own practice. What is clear is that the professional learning of teachers has become increasingly recognised as important in enhancing not only the quality of teaching in schools but also for developing the teaching profession more generally (Berry, Clemans, & Kostogriz, 2007). PL approaches tend to emphasize practices that are: sustained over time; responsive to the specifics of school and classroom contexts; underpinned by research and practice-based evidence; and, supported by professional learning communities and collaboration (Hayes, Mills, Christie, & Lingard, 2006; Hoban, 2002). In short, PD could be viewed as doing things to teachers so that they apply them in their practice while PL is about working with teachers to help them develop their skills, knowledge and abilities in ways that are responsive to their (pedagogical) needs, issues and concerns.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Berry, A., Clemans, A., & Kostogriz, A. (Eds.). (2007). Dimensions of professional learning: Identities, professionalism and practice. Dordrecht: Sense Publishers.Google Scholar
  2. DEECD (2005). Professional learning in effective schools: The seven principles of highly effective professional learning Retrieved 11 March, 2009, from http://www.eduweb.vic.gov.au/edulibrary/public/teachlearn/teacher/ProfLearningInEffectiveSchools.pdf
  3. DEECD (2006). Learning to Lead Effective Schools Retrieved 14 December 2007, from http://www.education.vic.gov.au/proflearning/schoolleadership/default.htm
  4. Fullan, M. (2007). Change the terms for teacher learning. Journal of Staff Development,, 28(3), 35–36.Google Scholar
  5. Hayes, D., Mills, M., Christie, P., & Lingard, B. (2006). Teachers and schooling making a difference. Sydney: Allen and Unwin.Google Scholar
  6. Hoban, G. F. (2002). Teacher learning for educational change: A systems thinking approach. Buckingham: Open University Press.Google Scholar
  7. Lieberrman, A., & Wood, D. (2002). From network learning to classroom teaching. Journal of Educational Chang,3, 315–337.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Loughran, J. J., & Northfield, J. R. (1996). Opening the classroom door: Teacher, researcher, learner. London: Falmer Press.Google Scholar
  9. Lundeberg, M. (1999). Discovering teaching and learning through cases. In M. A. Lundeberg, B. B. Levin & H. Harrington (Eds.), Who learns what from cases and how: The research base for teaching and learning with cases. Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc.Google Scholar
  10. Mockler, N. (2005). Trans/forming teachers: New professional learning and transformative teacher professionalism. Journal of In-service Education, 31(4), 733–746.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  11. Schön, D. A. (1983). The reflective practitioner: How professionals think in action. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  12. Shulman, J. H. (1992). Case methods in teacher education. New York: Teachers College Press.Google Scholar
  13. Wei, R. C., Darling-Hammond, L., Andree, A., Richardson, N., & Orphanos, S. (2009). Professional learning in the learning profession: A status report on teacher develompent in the U.S. and abroad. Dallas, TX: National Staff Development Council.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Sense Publishers 2011

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Loughran
    • 1
  • Amanda Berry
    • 1
  • Allie Clemans
    • 1
  • Stephen Keast
    • 1
  • Bianca Miranda
    • 1
  • Graham Parr
    • 1
  • Philip Riley
    • 1
  • Elizabeth Tudball
    • 1
  1. 1.Monash UniversityAustralia

Personalised recommendations