Rethinking Critical Theory and Qualitative Research

  • Joe L. Kincheloe
  • Peter Mclaren
Part of the Bold Visions in Educational Research book series (BVER, volume 32)

Abstract

Some 70 years after its development in Frankfurt, Germany, critical theory retains its ability to disrupt and hallenge the status quo. In the process, it elicits highlycharged emotions of all types—fierce loyalty from its roponents, vehement hostility from its detractors. Such vibrantly polar reactions indicate at the very least that critical theory still matters. We can be against critical theory or for it, but, especially at the present historical uncture, we cannot be without it.

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  • Joe L. Kincheloe
  • Peter Mclaren

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